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Turkey Soup with Lemon and Barley

Turkey Soup with Lemon and Barley


Turkey soup made with chopped leftover turkey, onions, garlic, barley, herbs, turmeric, cumin, and ginger.

Photography Credit:Elise Bauer

Like turkey soup but want to change things up a bit this year with your turkey leftovers? Now here’s a detour from tradition, a riff on a classic Middle Eastern lemon chicken soup.

The strong flavor of turkey meat holds up beautifully to the acidic lemon and bright turmeric, cumin, and ginger spices. The addition of barley gives the soup body.

We used turkey stock from the carcass of a roast turkey, but you could easily use chicken stock.

Turkey Soup with Lemon and Barley Recipe

If you are cooking gluten-free, use rice instead of barley.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 large onion, grated or minced
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • Salt
  • Pepper
  • 6 cups turkey stock or chicken stock
  • Strips of lemon zest, from one lemon*
  • 1/2 cup to 1 cup barley (more barley will yield a thicker soup)
  • 2 cups chopped cooked turkey
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup chopped parsley
  • 1/4 cup chopped cilantro (can sub with more parsley)

*Use a vegetable peeler to peel strips of zest from a lemon. Use a sharp knife to scrape out and discard any of the white pith that still remains on the inside of the zest strips.

Method

1 Sauté the onion, garlic, spices: Heat the olive oil over medium-high heat in a heavy pot or Dutch oven. Add the grated onion and cook until the onion is translucent, about 3 minutes. Stir in the minced garlic and cook another minute, then mix in the turmeric, cumin, ground ginger and a generous pinch of salt.

2 Add stock, zest, bring to simmer then add barley: Pour in the turkey stock and add the strips of lemon zest. Bring to a simmer, then add the barley. Simmer gently until the barley is cooked, about 20-30 minutes.

3 Add cooked turkey, lemon juice, parsley, cilantro, salt, pepper: When the barley is cooked through, add the chopped cooked turkey, lemon juice, parsley and cilantro, and salt and pepper to taste. Cook gently just until the turkey is warmed through, about 3-5 minutes. Remove the lemon zest strips before serving.

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Recipe Summary

  • 5 quarts water, or as needed
  • 1 turkey carcass
  • 1 ½ cups coarsely chopped onion
  • 3 stalks celery
  • ½ cup chopped carrot
  • 10 whole black peppercorns
  • 1 pinch dried thyme, or to taste
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 ½ pounds carrots, cut into 1-inch chunks
  • 2 onions, diced
  • 6 stalks celery, cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • 1 cup barley
  • ½ cup chopped mushrooms
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon dried marjoram
  • ½ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 pinch dried thyme

Bring water and turkey carcass to a boil in a large pot add 1 1/2 cup chopped onion, 3 stalks celery, 1/2 cup chopped carrot, peppercorns, 1 pinch thyme, and 1 bay leaf. Simmer, skimming excess fat and foam from top of stock as needed, 2 to 2 1/2 hours. Add more water to stock as it evaporates. Remove carcass from stock and cool. Pull meat from bones and shred refrigerate until needed. Strain stock and return liquid to pot.

Mix 1 1/2 pounds carrots, 2 onions, 6 stalks celery, barley, mushrooms, 2 bay leaves, salt, marjoram, black pepper, and 1 pinch thyme into turkey stock and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer soup, stirring occasionally, until barley is fully cooked, 1 hour and 20 minutes. Add turkey meat to the soup and simmer for 10 more minutes. Remove bay leaves before serving.


Recipe Summary

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 3 pounds turkey bones
  • 1 onion, quartered
  • 1 stalk celery, coarsely chopped
  • 1 carrot, coarsely chopped
  • 16 cups water
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 2 ½ cups water
  • 1 cup barley
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 2 carrots, sliced
  • 2 stalks celery, sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 cups chopped cooked turkey
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves stripped
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper
  • ⅛ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • ½ lemon, juiced

Heat vegetable oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Add turkey bones to hot oil cook, turning occasionally, until browned, about 10 minutes. Transfer bones to a bowl.

Cook and stir quartered onion, coarsely chopped celery, and coarsely chopped carrot in the hot oil in the same stockpot until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Return turkey bones to stockpot and add 16 cups water and thyme sprigs. Bring to a boil, skim off foam, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer until liquid reduces to 10 cups, about 2 hours. Strain stock into a large bowl and let stand for 15 minutes. Spoon fat off top of stock.

Bring 2 1/2 cup water and barley to a boil in a saucepan. Cover saucepan, reduce heat to low, and simmer until the barley is tender, 30 to 40 minutes.

Heat olive oil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat cook and stir diced onion, sliced carrots, sliced celery, and garlic until slightly softened, about 5 minutes. Add turkey stock to onion mixture and bring to a boil.

Mix turkey meat, barley, parsley, thyme leaves, salt, black pepper, and cayenne pepper into soup reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 20 minutes. Stir lemon juice into soup.


Indian Spiced Lemon Barley Turkey Soup

I SO WISH I could have gotten a beautiful picture of this soup, because it’s actually very pretty.

The warm golden yellow of the turmeric-seasoned broth is a lovely backdrop to the fresh green herbs, white pearls of barley and delicate shreds of turkey.

The rich, tangy smell that floods the kitchen while this soup is simmering, makes you want to dig right in.

Soft loaves of warm naan (indian bread) would take this dinner over the top and I fully intend to plan ahead better next time and serve this hot, tangy soup with homemade naan. Budget Bytes has a recipe I’ve been itching to try, so I’ll keep you posted!

If you are looking for a fresh, zesty alternative to plain chicken soup this is your dish!

The recipe calls for pretty basic ingredients and would be the perfect way to use up a turkey carcass leftover from the holidays (I may have left Christmas Eve dinner bearing the remains of the turkey and ham served that night!).

If making homemade stock isn’t your thing, you can certainly use store-bought chicken or turkey stock…just do yourself a favor and get the good stuff in the box from the natural section. The canned stocks are so full of sodium and other junk you just don’t need.

Also, this is called “turkey” soup but would also be delicious with chicken so don’t let the turkey keep you from trying it!

I’ve been sick since New Year’s Eve (and I’m SO OVER IT) and I think I particularly loved this soup last night because despite my sore throat and congestion, this soup was a party in my mouth! The flavors are deep and complex and were able to blast through the Fort Knox of my sick tastebuds.


Turkey Avgolemono Soup

I feel very un-American saying this but usually white, creamy soups freak me out. Pretty sure it all traces back to a long ago run in with a can of cream of mushroom soup that I thought you just ate as is not realizing you&rsquore supposed to add water.

I gag a little just thinking about that.

A few years after that experience I went to Greece right after my high school graduation.

Among moussaka, patstisio and what seemed like a million Greek salads over the course of 10 days, I had a single bowl of avgolemono soup that completely changed my tune about creamy white soups.

It was creamy, but not overly so, bright and fresh thanks to lemon and dill but hearty and filling thanks to the orzo.

I&rsquove had a few bowls since in the U.S. and unfortunately not a single one has compared, not even the one I got AT a local Greek festival. When you add eggs to hot liquid it can either be amazing or a hot mess. Unfortunately, I seem to have tried the hot messes.

Don&rsquot be freaked out by the egg thing either, if you temper them correctly (and that&rsquos not hard, just takes some constant whisking) you&rsquoll be fine. If you&rsquore lazy about it, you&rsquore gonna end up with scrambled eggs in a lemon soup and that&rsquos not only weird, it&rsquos gross. Don&rsquot be lazy.

Avgolemono usually has chicken in it but what better time to switch things up then Thanksgiving when you probably have pounds upon pounds of leftover turkey sitting in your fridge?

I was so excited to have Ulysses try this one knowing that I willingly made a traditional Greek dish and he didn&rsquot even have to drop hints about wanting it to get me to.

What was his response on the first spoonful? &ldquoI don&rsquot like dill.&rdquo Um, excuse me? You&rsquore first generation Greek and YOU DON&rsquoT LIKE DILL? I can&rsquot even guys&hellip

Since you can&rsquot trust a dill hating Greek, take it from me, this turkey avgolemono soup is amazing. If you&rsquore not hosting, make sure you grab some leftover turkey from whoever is and put this one on the menu for sometime over the long weekend!


Turkey Mulligatawny Soup

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The spices in this mulligatawny, a rich Indian soup flavored with curry and garam masala, will help you wake up from your post-Thanksgiving coma. We substitute leftover turkey for the more traditional chicken and finish the soup with creamy coconut milk and cilantro.

Game plan: You’ll need to make the garam masala and turkey stock before you begin.

This recipe was featured as part of our Thanksgiving Leftovers photo gallery. See our other favorite ways to use Thanksgiving leftovers.

Tips for Christmas

Instructions

  1. 1 Melt butter in a large pot over medium heat. When it foams, add onion, season with salt, and cook until tender, about 3 minutes. Add apple, carrot, and garlic, stir to coat in butter, and season again with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Sauté until apple is tender and onion is translucent, about 5 minutes.
  2. 2 Sprinkle flour, curry powder, garam masala, cumin, and cloves over vegetables and stir until spices are fragrant and flour has cooked slightly, about 2 minutes.
  3. 3 Slowly add stock or broth, stirring until flour has dissolved. Bring to a simmer and cook until vegetables are tender, about 10 minutes.
  4. 4 Add turkey, rice, coconut milk, and lemon juice and return soup to a simmer for about 10 minutes. Stir in lemon zest, if using, and season with additional salt and freshly ground black pepper as desired. Ladle soup into bowls, garnish with cilantro, and serve.

Beverage pairing: Hecht & Bannier Vin de Pays des Côtes de Thau Syrah Rosé, France. Syrah and Indian spices typically go well together, but a deep, red wine would probably overwhelm the soup. The solution is a Syrah rosé, which still possesses some of the savory/sweet fruit of the grape, while delivering it in a rounder, mellower package.


Turkey Soup with Lemon and Barley - Recipes

I SO WISH I could have gotten a beautiful picture of this soup, because it’s actually very pretty.

The warm golden yellow of the turmeric-seasoned broth is a lovely backdrop to the fresh green herbs, white pearls of barley and delicate shreds of turkey.

The rich, tangy smell that floods the kitchen while this soup is simmering, makes you want to dig right in.

Soft loaves of warm naan (indian bread) would take this dinner over the top and I fully intend to plan ahead better next time and serve this hot, tangy soup with homemade naan. Budget Bytes has a recipe I’ve been itching to try, so I’ll keep you posted!

If you are looking for a fresh, zesty alternative to plain chicken soup this is your dish!

The recipe calls for pretty basic ingredients and would be the perfect way to use up a turkey carcass leftover from the holidays (I may have left Christmas Eve dinner bearing the remains of the turkey and ham served that night!).

If making homemade stock isn’t your thing, you can certainly use store-bought chicken or turkey stock…just do yourself a favor and get the good stuff in the box from the natural section. The canned stocks are so full of sodium and other junk you just don’t need.

Also, this is called “turkey” soup but would also be delicious with chicken so don’t let the turkey keep you from trying it!

I’ve been sick since New Year’s Eve (and I’m SO OVER IT) and I think I particularly loved this soup last night because despite my sore throat and congestion, this soup was a party in my mouth! The flavors are deep and complex and were able to blast through the Fort Knox of my sick tastebuds.


  • olive oil 1 tbsp 1 tbsp
  • medium onion (peeled and diced) 1 1
  • medium carrots (diced (about 1 1/2 cups)) 2 2
  • stalks celery (diced) 2 2
  • sliced mushrooms 8 oz 227 g
  • quick cooking barley 1/2 cup 1/2 cup
  • fat-free low-sodium chicken broth 4 cups 4 cups
  • water 2 cups 2 cups
  • cooked turket breast (shredded or diced) 2 cups (about 10 oz) 2 cups (about 10 oz)
  • salt 1/2 tsp 1/2 tsp
  • ground black pepper 1/2 tsp 1/2 tsp

Spiced Sweet Potato Fries

Garlic Mashed Potato Soup

Cheddar Cheese and Broccoli Soup


2 cups turkey light meat, skinless, cooked and cubed
3 cups water
1/2 cup celery, sliced
10 ounces frozen mixed vegetables, thawed
14 1/2 ounces chicken broth
1 teaspoon poultry seasoning
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 cup elbow macaroni or bowtie pasta, uncooked

In a quart 4-quart saucepan, combine turkey, water, celery, vegetables, broth, poultry seasoning, and black pepper. Cook over high heat, stirring occasionally, until mixture comes to a full boil.

Add pasta and reduce heat to low. Cover and continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until pasta is tender.


This Turkey Rice Soup makes fantastic leftovers. The flavors build and meld and the rice stays al dente and doesn’t absorb excess liquid like white rice can.

  • Storage: Let Turkey Rice Soup cool to room temperature, then cover and store in your Dutch oven or transfer to an airtight container. Refrigerate for up to 5 days.
  • Stove: Reheat large batches on the stove over medium low heat, stirring occasionally, about 10 minutes.
  • Microwave: Transfer individual servings to a microwave-safe dish, cover with a microwave-safe lids or paper towel. Microwave for 2 minutes, stir, then continue to microwave for 30-second intervals, if needed.
  • Crockpot: Transfer soup to a crockpot and heat on low for 1-3 hours. The time will depend on how much soup you have remaining.

Watch the video: ΣΟΥΠΑ ΜΙΝΕΣΤΡΟΝΕ