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The Best and Worst Health News of 2016 Slideshow

The Best and Worst Health News of 2016 Slideshow


Butter is back and the five-second rule is out

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BMI Shouldn’t Be Used as an Indicator of Health

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A person’s body mass index (weight in kilograms/meters squared) is the current metric used to evaluate whether a person is considered to be at a healthy weight, but a new study suggested that this measurement might not be the most accurate indicator of overall health. Janet Tomiyama, the study’s lead author, says that based on available cardiometabolic health data (a more accurate gauge of overall health that measures blood pressure, cholesterol, glucose, insulin resistance, triglycerides, and inflammation), BMI is misclassifying nearly 75 million Americans as healthy or unhealthy, which results in inflated health care costs for perfectly healthy individuals.

Butter Isn’t as Bad as Sugar

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This past year was without a doubt a comeback year for fats. TIME magazine published a piece exonerating butter, calling it “better than sugar, but worse than olive oil” for your health, while The New York Times released an exposé explaining how in the 1960s, the sugar industry paid scientists to shift the blame for heart disease away from sugar and toward saturated fat. Currently, the American Heart Association warns that a diet high in added sugar can substantially increase a person’s risk of dying from heart disease.

Cranberry Juice Doesn't Help Cure Urinary Tract Infections,

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Contrary to popular belief, the cranberry juice commonly found on grocery store shelves is ineffective at preventing urinary tract infections. Cranberries do in fact contain compounds that defend against bacterial infection in the bladder wall, which can help prevent UTIs, but cranberry juice doesn’t have a high enough concentration of these compounds to do much good. In order for a noticeable reduction in bacterial adhesion, a person would have to consume at least 32 ounces of cranberry juice daily.

The “Five-Second Rule” Was Disproved

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Is nothing sacred? The “five-second rule” holds that if a piece of food falls on the ground, but is picked up within five seconds, it’s still “safe” to eat. Researchers from Rutgers University tested the amount of bacteria picked up by different foods being dropped on different surfaces for various time frames, ranging from one to 300 seconds. Though the results of the experiment didn’t explicitly disprove the five-second rule, it did conclude that food with higher moisture content could be contaminated by bacteria instantaneously.

Frequent Consumption of Splenda Was Linked by One Study to Leukemia

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Artificial sweeteners found in diet sodas and low-calorie candies have been linked to diabetes, weight gain, and headaches, but a new study published by the watchdog nutrition group Center for Science in the Public Interest has linked daily consumption of sucralose (more commonly known as Splenda) to a heightened risk of leukemia. The study was conducted on rats that were fed the equivalent of 10 diet sodas a day. Splenda has since responded to the results of the study claiming that sucralose has been extensively researched for over 20 years, and that the USDA, FDA, and World Health Organization have not detected a link between sucralose and cancer.

Live Music Relieves Stress

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There’s evidence proving that live music reduces stress. Researchers took saliva samples from 117 concert-goers — once before the performance and once again after an hour into the performance — in order to analyze their levels of two stress-related hormones, cortisol (also known as the fight-or-flight hormone) and cortisone. The results showed significant reductions in both hormones after the study participants listened to the music.

More Vitamin D Reduces Risk of Cancer

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It’s time to get more sunshine; recent evidence showed that the chances of developing cancer increased with lower levels of vitamin D. A study conducted by a professor at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine demonstrated that the trial participants whose intake of vitamin D was 40 nanograms per milliliter or higher had a 67 percent lower risk of cancer risk. But while sunshine provides your body with vitamin D, too many UV rays can lead to sunburn and melanoma.

Obesity Ties Cancer as Top Perceived Health Threat

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A survey conducted by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery and the University of Chicago found that 81 percent of Americans now consider obesity to be the greatest health threat facing the country, tying it with cancer and putting it ahead of heart disease, diabetes, and mental illnesses.

Onion Compound Suppresses Ovarian Cancer Cell Growth

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Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most common type of ovarian cancer, but it’s also one of the deadliest with a five-year survival rate of only around 40 percent. Relapse rates for chemotherapy treatments for EOC are high (around 80 percent), but scientists have discovered a potential cure in a natural compound found in onions called onionin A. Studies on mice showed that oral doses of onionin A reduced ovarian cancer tumor growth and increased their life spans.


Chronic Hives and Diet: The Debate Over What To Eat

What we eat has a huge impact on our health, but the best choices to make aren’t always obvious, especially when dealing with a difficult condition like chronic hives. Many people with chronic hives (also known as chronic urticaria) identify different foods as possible triggers of their symptoms and make dietary decisions without enough information. In the following slides, we’ll explore some of the facts, myths, and up-for-debate information about food and chronic hives.

When it comes to hives, food is often listed among the common triggers for patients to be aware of. People with either chronic or acute cases of hives are often asked to keep track of their hives symptoms and note foods they consume before their symptoms started. If a food is suspected, allergy testing may be done. Other common triggers are medications, insect bites/stings, latex, infections, or other allergens people come in contact with.

For chronic idiopathic hives (or hives where a cause can’t be determined) doctors and researchers often debate if food and diet have an effect. Some studies have found that food isn’t a common trigger and diet isn’t relevant in cases of chronic hives. Other studies argue for the importance of taking a closer look at how food is involved in cases where another cause can’t be found.

Regardless of differing viewpoints by researchers, both sides have noted that patients with chronic hives often believe that their skin condition is at least aggravated by certain foods. Many people avoid foods they suspect of causing hives. These avoidance diets can affect their overall health if they aren’t getting proper nutrition, as well as their personal and social lives.

Some studies have found that patients who eat a low-histamine diet report decreased symptoms and improved quality of life. Histamine is a chemical released from mast cells in the body as part of an allergic response. In one study from Korea, patients showed significant improvement in their symptoms and decreasing levels of histamine in their blood after being on a histamine-free diet for four weeks.

Although studies noted that less than 2 percent of chronic hives cases have a food allergy, some chronic hives patients are believed to have a histamine intolerance, which may be a trigger for their unexplained hives. A histamine intolerance mimics reactions similar to a food allergy, and may cause a hives reaction, but it’s unclear how common these reactions are among chronic hives patients.

A person with a food allergy has an immediate reaction after eating the food. Skin and blood tests will confirm the allergy. People with a histamine intolerance have these chemicals build in their system over time. Once histamines reach a certain threshold, it can cause an allergic-type reaction, like hives. It’s likely the person will test negative for a food allergy. Because of this, histamine intolerance is considered a “pseudoallergy.”

Based on the theory that some people with chronic hives have a histamine intolerance, researchers have examined the effect of low histamine/low pseudoallergy diets. One study, which looked at 56 patients who followed a low-histamine diet for three weeks, found that 75 percent of patients showed improved symptoms for their chronic hives. That study also concluded that a low-histamine diet followed for three to four weeks may help reduce symptoms and improve quality of life for people suffering from chronic hives.

Foods that are typically avoided are known to be high in histamines or can cause a histamine response. These may include citrus fruit spinach, eggplant, tomatoes, artichokes, and avocado aged cheeses and fermented foods, such as gouda and sauerkraut processed meats like sausage and salami shrimp and processed fish including sardines, tuna, and herring. Also, egg whites and most alcoholic beverages (especially red wine) are high in histamines.

Avoiding foods high in histamines if a person doesn’t have food allergies is considered controversial. It’s ineffective and puts unnecessary restrictions on a person’s diet, some studies say. One study found that in 95 percent of patients with self-reported food reactions, the food they were eating wasn’t related to the onset of their symptoms. Still, the study found that more than 80 percent of these patients were carrying out unnecessary dietary restrictions that might be detrimental to their health.

Some doctors believe there is no connection between chronic hives and histamine intolerances, and have even called pseudoallergies a myth, saying that there isn’t enough support in these studies to prove such diets work. Other studies indicate that a low-histamine diet is an easy, low-cost tool to decrease symptoms and increase quality of life for chronic hives patients.

There is no easy answer to the question about what diet is best for people with chronic hives. In fact, this debate is one of the most contentious disagreements between the US and international medical guidelines on chronic hives.

As part of its guidelines on managing hives, the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology doesn’t recommend low-histamine (or pseudoallergen-free) diets because it says studies looking at this issue weren’t well controlled and didn’t meet stringent research standards. However, international guidelines acknowledge “pseudo allergen-free” diets as an alternative treatment that may help some chronic hives patients.

The World Allergy Organization has also noted that that doctors in different areas of the world have widely differing views when it comes to low-histamine diets for chronic hives. While many U.S. doctors see low-histamine diets as having limited success, some doctors in Europe and elsewhere recommend such diets be followed and then gradually expanded.

Rachel Zohn is a mom, a wife, and a freelance writer who is striving to find the best way to juggle it all and maintain a sense of humor. She is a former newspaper reporter with a deep interest in writing about all things related to health, wellness and the human body. She enjoys writing about various health topics, including skin conditions such as eczema, different types of cancer and seasonal allergies.


Chronic Hives and Diet: The Debate Over What To Eat

What we eat has a huge impact on our health, but the best choices to make aren’t always obvious, especially when dealing with a difficult condition like chronic hives. Many people with chronic hives (also known as chronic urticaria) identify different foods as possible triggers of their symptoms and make dietary decisions without enough information. In the following slides, we’ll explore some of the facts, myths, and up-for-debate information about food and chronic hives.

When it comes to hives, food is often listed among the common triggers for patients to be aware of. People with either chronic or acute cases of hives are often asked to keep track of their hives symptoms and note foods they consume before their symptoms started. If a food is suspected, allergy testing may be done. Other common triggers are medications, insect bites/stings, latex, infections, or other allergens people come in contact with.

For chronic idiopathic hives (or hives where a cause can’t be determined) doctors and researchers often debate if food and diet have an effect. Some studies have found that food isn’t a common trigger and diet isn’t relevant in cases of chronic hives. Other studies argue for the importance of taking a closer look at how food is involved in cases where another cause can’t be found.

Regardless of differing viewpoints by researchers, both sides have noted that patients with chronic hives often believe that their skin condition is at least aggravated by certain foods. Many people avoid foods they suspect of causing hives. These avoidance diets can affect their overall health if they aren’t getting proper nutrition, as well as their personal and social lives.

Some studies have found that patients who eat a low-histamine diet report decreased symptoms and improved quality of life. Histamine is a chemical released from mast cells in the body as part of an allergic response. In one study from Korea, patients showed significant improvement in their symptoms and decreasing levels of histamine in their blood after being on a histamine-free diet for four weeks.

Although studies noted that less than 2 percent of chronic hives cases have a food allergy, some chronic hives patients are believed to have a histamine intolerance, which may be a trigger for their unexplained hives. A histamine intolerance mimics reactions similar to a food allergy, and may cause a hives reaction, but it’s unclear how common these reactions are among chronic hives patients.

A person with a food allergy has an immediate reaction after eating the food. Skin and blood tests will confirm the allergy. People with a histamine intolerance have these chemicals build in their system over time. Once histamines reach a certain threshold, it can cause an allergic-type reaction, like hives. It’s likely the person will test negative for a food allergy. Because of this, histamine intolerance is considered a “pseudoallergy.”

Based on the theory that some people with chronic hives have a histamine intolerance, researchers have examined the effect of low histamine/low pseudoallergy diets. One study, which looked at 56 patients who followed a low-histamine diet for three weeks, found that 75 percent of patients showed improved symptoms for their chronic hives. That study also concluded that a low-histamine diet followed for three to four weeks may help reduce symptoms and improve quality of life for people suffering from chronic hives.

Foods that are typically avoided are known to be high in histamines or can cause a histamine response. These may include citrus fruit spinach, eggplant, tomatoes, artichokes, and avocado aged cheeses and fermented foods, such as gouda and sauerkraut processed meats like sausage and salami shrimp and processed fish including sardines, tuna, and herring. Also, egg whites and most alcoholic beverages (especially red wine) are high in histamines.

Avoiding foods high in histamines if a person doesn’t have food allergies is considered controversial. It’s ineffective and puts unnecessary restrictions on a person’s diet, some studies say. One study found that in 95 percent of patients with self-reported food reactions, the food they were eating wasn’t related to the onset of their symptoms. Still, the study found that more than 80 percent of these patients were carrying out unnecessary dietary restrictions that might be detrimental to their health.

Some doctors believe there is no connection between chronic hives and histamine intolerances, and have even called pseudoallergies a myth, saying that there isn’t enough support in these studies to prove such diets work. Other studies indicate that a low-histamine diet is an easy, low-cost tool to decrease symptoms and increase quality of life for chronic hives patients.

There is no easy answer to the question about what diet is best for people with chronic hives. In fact, this debate is one of the most contentious disagreements between the US and international medical guidelines on chronic hives.

As part of its guidelines on managing hives, the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology doesn’t recommend low-histamine (or pseudoallergen-free) diets because it says studies looking at this issue weren’t well controlled and didn’t meet stringent research standards. However, international guidelines acknowledge “pseudo allergen-free” diets as an alternative treatment that may help some chronic hives patients.

The World Allergy Organization has also noted that that doctors in different areas of the world have widely differing views when it comes to low-histamine diets for chronic hives. While many U.S. doctors see low-histamine diets as having limited success, some doctors in Europe and elsewhere recommend such diets be followed and then gradually expanded.

Rachel Zohn is a mom, a wife, and a freelance writer who is striving to find the best way to juggle it all and maintain a sense of humor. She is a former newspaper reporter with a deep interest in writing about all things related to health, wellness and the human body. She enjoys writing about various health topics, including skin conditions such as eczema, different types of cancer and seasonal allergies.


Chronic Hives and Diet: The Debate Over What To Eat

What we eat has a huge impact on our health, but the best choices to make aren’t always obvious, especially when dealing with a difficult condition like chronic hives. Many people with chronic hives (also known as chronic urticaria) identify different foods as possible triggers of their symptoms and make dietary decisions without enough information. In the following slides, we’ll explore some of the facts, myths, and up-for-debate information about food and chronic hives.

When it comes to hives, food is often listed among the common triggers for patients to be aware of. People with either chronic or acute cases of hives are often asked to keep track of their hives symptoms and note foods they consume before their symptoms started. If a food is suspected, allergy testing may be done. Other common triggers are medications, insect bites/stings, latex, infections, or other allergens people come in contact with.

For chronic idiopathic hives (or hives where a cause can’t be determined) doctors and researchers often debate if food and diet have an effect. Some studies have found that food isn’t a common trigger and diet isn’t relevant in cases of chronic hives. Other studies argue for the importance of taking a closer look at how food is involved in cases where another cause can’t be found.

Regardless of differing viewpoints by researchers, both sides have noted that patients with chronic hives often believe that their skin condition is at least aggravated by certain foods. Many people avoid foods they suspect of causing hives. These avoidance diets can affect their overall health if they aren’t getting proper nutrition, as well as their personal and social lives.

Some studies have found that patients who eat a low-histamine diet report decreased symptoms and improved quality of life. Histamine is a chemical released from mast cells in the body as part of an allergic response. In one study from Korea, patients showed significant improvement in their symptoms and decreasing levels of histamine in their blood after being on a histamine-free diet for four weeks.

Although studies noted that less than 2 percent of chronic hives cases have a food allergy, some chronic hives patients are believed to have a histamine intolerance, which may be a trigger for their unexplained hives. A histamine intolerance mimics reactions similar to a food allergy, and may cause a hives reaction, but it’s unclear how common these reactions are among chronic hives patients.

A person with a food allergy has an immediate reaction after eating the food. Skin and blood tests will confirm the allergy. People with a histamine intolerance have these chemicals build in their system over time. Once histamines reach a certain threshold, it can cause an allergic-type reaction, like hives. It’s likely the person will test negative for a food allergy. Because of this, histamine intolerance is considered a “pseudoallergy.”

Based on the theory that some people with chronic hives have a histamine intolerance, researchers have examined the effect of low histamine/low pseudoallergy diets. One study, which looked at 56 patients who followed a low-histamine diet for three weeks, found that 75 percent of patients showed improved symptoms for their chronic hives. That study also concluded that a low-histamine diet followed for three to four weeks may help reduce symptoms and improve quality of life for people suffering from chronic hives.

Foods that are typically avoided are known to be high in histamines or can cause a histamine response. These may include citrus fruit spinach, eggplant, tomatoes, artichokes, and avocado aged cheeses and fermented foods, such as gouda and sauerkraut processed meats like sausage and salami shrimp and processed fish including sardines, tuna, and herring. Also, egg whites and most alcoholic beverages (especially red wine) are high in histamines.

Avoiding foods high in histamines if a person doesn’t have food allergies is considered controversial. It’s ineffective and puts unnecessary restrictions on a person’s diet, some studies say. One study found that in 95 percent of patients with self-reported food reactions, the food they were eating wasn’t related to the onset of their symptoms. Still, the study found that more than 80 percent of these patients were carrying out unnecessary dietary restrictions that might be detrimental to their health.

Some doctors believe there is no connection between chronic hives and histamine intolerances, and have even called pseudoallergies a myth, saying that there isn’t enough support in these studies to prove such diets work. Other studies indicate that a low-histamine diet is an easy, low-cost tool to decrease symptoms and increase quality of life for chronic hives patients.

There is no easy answer to the question about what diet is best for people with chronic hives. In fact, this debate is one of the most contentious disagreements between the US and international medical guidelines on chronic hives.

As part of its guidelines on managing hives, the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology doesn’t recommend low-histamine (or pseudoallergen-free) diets because it says studies looking at this issue weren’t well controlled and didn’t meet stringent research standards. However, international guidelines acknowledge “pseudo allergen-free” diets as an alternative treatment that may help some chronic hives patients.

The World Allergy Organization has also noted that that doctors in different areas of the world have widely differing views when it comes to low-histamine diets for chronic hives. While many U.S. doctors see low-histamine diets as having limited success, some doctors in Europe and elsewhere recommend such diets be followed and then gradually expanded.

Rachel Zohn is a mom, a wife, and a freelance writer who is striving to find the best way to juggle it all and maintain a sense of humor. She is a former newspaper reporter with a deep interest in writing about all things related to health, wellness and the human body. She enjoys writing about various health topics, including skin conditions such as eczema, different types of cancer and seasonal allergies.


Chronic Hives and Diet: The Debate Over What To Eat

What we eat has a huge impact on our health, but the best choices to make aren’t always obvious, especially when dealing with a difficult condition like chronic hives. Many people with chronic hives (also known as chronic urticaria) identify different foods as possible triggers of their symptoms and make dietary decisions without enough information. In the following slides, we’ll explore some of the facts, myths, and up-for-debate information about food and chronic hives.

When it comes to hives, food is often listed among the common triggers for patients to be aware of. People with either chronic or acute cases of hives are often asked to keep track of their hives symptoms and note foods they consume before their symptoms started. If a food is suspected, allergy testing may be done. Other common triggers are medications, insect bites/stings, latex, infections, or other allergens people come in contact with.

For chronic idiopathic hives (or hives where a cause can’t be determined) doctors and researchers often debate if food and diet have an effect. Some studies have found that food isn’t a common trigger and diet isn’t relevant in cases of chronic hives. Other studies argue for the importance of taking a closer look at how food is involved in cases where another cause can’t be found.

Regardless of differing viewpoints by researchers, both sides have noted that patients with chronic hives often believe that their skin condition is at least aggravated by certain foods. Many people avoid foods they suspect of causing hives. These avoidance diets can affect their overall health if they aren’t getting proper nutrition, as well as their personal and social lives.

Some studies have found that patients who eat a low-histamine diet report decreased symptoms and improved quality of life. Histamine is a chemical released from mast cells in the body as part of an allergic response. In one study from Korea, patients showed significant improvement in their symptoms and decreasing levels of histamine in their blood after being on a histamine-free diet for four weeks.

Although studies noted that less than 2 percent of chronic hives cases have a food allergy, some chronic hives patients are believed to have a histamine intolerance, which may be a trigger for their unexplained hives. A histamine intolerance mimics reactions similar to a food allergy, and may cause a hives reaction, but it’s unclear how common these reactions are among chronic hives patients.

A person with a food allergy has an immediate reaction after eating the food. Skin and blood tests will confirm the allergy. People with a histamine intolerance have these chemicals build in their system over time. Once histamines reach a certain threshold, it can cause an allergic-type reaction, like hives. It’s likely the person will test negative for a food allergy. Because of this, histamine intolerance is considered a “pseudoallergy.”

Based on the theory that some people with chronic hives have a histamine intolerance, researchers have examined the effect of low histamine/low pseudoallergy diets. One study, which looked at 56 patients who followed a low-histamine diet for three weeks, found that 75 percent of patients showed improved symptoms for their chronic hives. That study also concluded that a low-histamine diet followed for three to four weeks may help reduce symptoms and improve quality of life for people suffering from chronic hives.

Foods that are typically avoided are known to be high in histamines or can cause a histamine response. These may include citrus fruit spinach, eggplant, tomatoes, artichokes, and avocado aged cheeses and fermented foods, such as gouda and sauerkraut processed meats like sausage and salami shrimp and processed fish including sardines, tuna, and herring. Also, egg whites and most alcoholic beverages (especially red wine) are high in histamines.

Avoiding foods high in histamines if a person doesn’t have food allergies is considered controversial. It’s ineffective and puts unnecessary restrictions on a person’s diet, some studies say. One study found that in 95 percent of patients with self-reported food reactions, the food they were eating wasn’t related to the onset of their symptoms. Still, the study found that more than 80 percent of these patients were carrying out unnecessary dietary restrictions that might be detrimental to their health.

Some doctors believe there is no connection between chronic hives and histamine intolerances, and have even called pseudoallergies a myth, saying that there isn’t enough support in these studies to prove such diets work. Other studies indicate that a low-histamine diet is an easy, low-cost tool to decrease symptoms and increase quality of life for chronic hives patients.

There is no easy answer to the question about what diet is best for people with chronic hives. In fact, this debate is one of the most contentious disagreements between the US and international medical guidelines on chronic hives.

As part of its guidelines on managing hives, the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology doesn’t recommend low-histamine (or pseudoallergen-free) diets because it says studies looking at this issue weren’t well controlled and didn’t meet stringent research standards. However, international guidelines acknowledge “pseudo allergen-free” diets as an alternative treatment that may help some chronic hives patients.

The World Allergy Organization has also noted that that doctors in different areas of the world have widely differing views when it comes to low-histamine diets for chronic hives. While many U.S. doctors see low-histamine diets as having limited success, some doctors in Europe and elsewhere recommend such diets be followed and then gradually expanded.

Rachel Zohn is a mom, a wife, and a freelance writer who is striving to find the best way to juggle it all and maintain a sense of humor. She is a former newspaper reporter with a deep interest in writing about all things related to health, wellness and the human body. She enjoys writing about various health topics, including skin conditions such as eczema, different types of cancer and seasonal allergies.


Chronic Hives and Diet: The Debate Over What To Eat

What we eat has a huge impact on our health, but the best choices to make aren’t always obvious, especially when dealing with a difficult condition like chronic hives. Many people with chronic hives (also known as chronic urticaria) identify different foods as possible triggers of their symptoms and make dietary decisions without enough information. In the following slides, we’ll explore some of the facts, myths, and up-for-debate information about food and chronic hives.

When it comes to hives, food is often listed among the common triggers for patients to be aware of. People with either chronic or acute cases of hives are often asked to keep track of their hives symptoms and note foods they consume before their symptoms started. If a food is suspected, allergy testing may be done. Other common triggers are medications, insect bites/stings, latex, infections, or other allergens people come in contact with.

For chronic idiopathic hives (or hives where a cause can’t be determined) doctors and researchers often debate if food and diet have an effect. Some studies have found that food isn’t a common trigger and diet isn’t relevant in cases of chronic hives. Other studies argue for the importance of taking a closer look at how food is involved in cases where another cause can’t be found.

Regardless of differing viewpoints by researchers, both sides have noted that patients with chronic hives often believe that their skin condition is at least aggravated by certain foods. Many people avoid foods they suspect of causing hives. These avoidance diets can affect their overall health if they aren’t getting proper nutrition, as well as their personal and social lives.

Some studies have found that patients who eat a low-histamine diet report decreased symptoms and improved quality of life. Histamine is a chemical released from mast cells in the body as part of an allergic response. In one study from Korea, patients showed significant improvement in their symptoms and decreasing levels of histamine in their blood after being on a histamine-free diet for four weeks.

Although studies noted that less than 2 percent of chronic hives cases have a food allergy, some chronic hives patients are believed to have a histamine intolerance, which may be a trigger for their unexplained hives. A histamine intolerance mimics reactions similar to a food allergy, and may cause a hives reaction, but it’s unclear how common these reactions are among chronic hives patients.

A person with a food allergy has an immediate reaction after eating the food. Skin and blood tests will confirm the allergy. People with a histamine intolerance have these chemicals build in their system over time. Once histamines reach a certain threshold, it can cause an allergic-type reaction, like hives. It’s likely the person will test negative for a food allergy. Because of this, histamine intolerance is considered a “pseudoallergy.”

Based on the theory that some people with chronic hives have a histamine intolerance, researchers have examined the effect of low histamine/low pseudoallergy diets. One study, which looked at 56 patients who followed a low-histamine diet for three weeks, found that 75 percent of patients showed improved symptoms for their chronic hives. That study also concluded that a low-histamine diet followed for three to four weeks may help reduce symptoms and improve quality of life for people suffering from chronic hives.

Foods that are typically avoided are known to be high in histamines or can cause a histamine response. These may include citrus fruit spinach, eggplant, tomatoes, artichokes, and avocado aged cheeses and fermented foods, such as gouda and sauerkraut processed meats like sausage and salami shrimp and processed fish including sardines, tuna, and herring. Also, egg whites and most alcoholic beverages (especially red wine) are high in histamines.

Avoiding foods high in histamines if a person doesn’t have food allergies is considered controversial. It’s ineffective and puts unnecessary restrictions on a person’s diet, some studies say. One study found that in 95 percent of patients with self-reported food reactions, the food they were eating wasn’t related to the onset of their symptoms. Still, the study found that more than 80 percent of these patients were carrying out unnecessary dietary restrictions that might be detrimental to their health.

Some doctors believe there is no connection between chronic hives and histamine intolerances, and have even called pseudoallergies a myth, saying that there isn’t enough support in these studies to prove such diets work. Other studies indicate that a low-histamine diet is an easy, low-cost tool to decrease symptoms and increase quality of life for chronic hives patients.

There is no easy answer to the question about what diet is best for people with chronic hives. In fact, this debate is one of the most contentious disagreements between the US and international medical guidelines on chronic hives.

As part of its guidelines on managing hives, the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology doesn’t recommend low-histamine (or pseudoallergen-free) diets because it says studies looking at this issue weren’t well controlled and didn’t meet stringent research standards. However, international guidelines acknowledge “pseudo allergen-free” diets as an alternative treatment that may help some chronic hives patients.

The World Allergy Organization has also noted that that doctors in different areas of the world have widely differing views when it comes to low-histamine diets for chronic hives. While many U.S. doctors see low-histamine diets as having limited success, some doctors in Europe and elsewhere recommend such diets be followed and then gradually expanded.

Rachel Zohn is a mom, a wife, and a freelance writer who is striving to find the best way to juggle it all and maintain a sense of humor. She is a former newspaper reporter with a deep interest in writing about all things related to health, wellness and the human body. She enjoys writing about various health topics, including skin conditions such as eczema, different types of cancer and seasonal allergies.


Chronic Hives and Diet: The Debate Over What To Eat

What we eat has a huge impact on our health, but the best choices to make aren’t always obvious, especially when dealing with a difficult condition like chronic hives. Many people with chronic hives (also known as chronic urticaria) identify different foods as possible triggers of their symptoms and make dietary decisions without enough information. In the following slides, we’ll explore some of the facts, myths, and up-for-debate information about food and chronic hives.

When it comes to hives, food is often listed among the common triggers for patients to be aware of. People with either chronic or acute cases of hives are often asked to keep track of their hives symptoms and note foods they consume before their symptoms started. If a food is suspected, allergy testing may be done. Other common triggers are medications, insect bites/stings, latex, infections, or other allergens people come in contact with.

For chronic idiopathic hives (or hives where a cause can’t be determined) doctors and researchers often debate if food and diet have an effect. Some studies have found that food isn’t a common trigger and diet isn’t relevant in cases of chronic hives. Other studies argue for the importance of taking a closer look at how food is involved in cases where another cause can’t be found.

Regardless of differing viewpoints by researchers, both sides have noted that patients with chronic hives often believe that their skin condition is at least aggravated by certain foods. Many people avoid foods they suspect of causing hives. These avoidance diets can affect their overall health if they aren’t getting proper nutrition, as well as their personal and social lives.

Some studies have found that patients who eat a low-histamine diet report decreased symptoms and improved quality of life. Histamine is a chemical released from mast cells in the body as part of an allergic response. In one study from Korea, patients showed significant improvement in their symptoms and decreasing levels of histamine in their blood after being on a histamine-free diet for four weeks.

Although studies noted that less than 2 percent of chronic hives cases have a food allergy, some chronic hives patients are believed to have a histamine intolerance, which may be a trigger for their unexplained hives. A histamine intolerance mimics reactions similar to a food allergy, and may cause a hives reaction, but it’s unclear how common these reactions are among chronic hives patients.

A person with a food allergy has an immediate reaction after eating the food. Skin and blood tests will confirm the allergy. People with a histamine intolerance have these chemicals build in their system over time. Once histamines reach a certain threshold, it can cause an allergic-type reaction, like hives. It’s likely the person will test negative for a food allergy. Because of this, histamine intolerance is considered a “pseudoallergy.”

Based on the theory that some people with chronic hives have a histamine intolerance, researchers have examined the effect of low histamine/low pseudoallergy diets. One study, which looked at 56 patients who followed a low-histamine diet for three weeks, found that 75 percent of patients showed improved symptoms for their chronic hives. That study also concluded that a low-histamine diet followed for three to four weeks may help reduce symptoms and improve quality of life for people suffering from chronic hives.

Foods that are typically avoided are known to be high in histamines or can cause a histamine response. These may include citrus fruit spinach, eggplant, tomatoes, artichokes, and avocado aged cheeses and fermented foods, such as gouda and sauerkraut processed meats like sausage and salami shrimp and processed fish including sardines, tuna, and herring. Also, egg whites and most alcoholic beverages (especially red wine) are high in histamines.

Avoiding foods high in histamines if a person doesn’t have food allergies is considered controversial. It’s ineffective and puts unnecessary restrictions on a person’s diet, some studies say. One study found that in 95 percent of patients with self-reported food reactions, the food they were eating wasn’t related to the onset of their symptoms. Still, the study found that more than 80 percent of these patients were carrying out unnecessary dietary restrictions that might be detrimental to their health.

Some doctors believe there is no connection between chronic hives and histamine intolerances, and have even called pseudoallergies a myth, saying that there isn’t enough support in these studies to prove such diets work. Other studies indicate that a low-histamine diet is an easy, low-cost tool to decrease symptoms and increase quality of life for chronic hives patients.

There is no easy answer to the question about what diet is best for people with chronic hives. In fact, this debate is one of the most contentious disagreements between the US and international medical guidelines on chronic hives.

As part of its guidelines on managing hives, the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology doesn’t recommend low-histamine (or pseudoallergen-free) diets because it says studies looking at this issue weren’t well controlled and didn’t meet stringent research standards. However, international guidelines acknowledge “pseudo allergen-free” diets as an alternative treatment that may help some chronic hives patients.

The World Allergy Organization has also noted that that doctors in different areas of the world have widely differing views when it comes to low-histamine diets for chronic hives. While many U.S. doctors see low-histamine diets as having limited success, some doctors in Europe and elsewhere recommend such diets be followed and then gradually expanded.

Rachel Zohn is a mom, a wife, and a freelance writer who is striving to find the best way to juggle it all and maintain a sense of humor. She is a former newspaper reporter with a deep interest in writing about all things related to health, wellness and the human body. She enjoys writing about various health topics, including skin conditions such as eczema, different types of cancer and seasonal allergies.


Chronic Hives and Diet: The Debate Over What To Eat

What we eat has a huge impact on our health, but the best choices to make aren’t always obvious, especially when dealing with a difficult condition like chronic hives. Many people with chronic hives (also known as chronic urticaria) identify different foods as possible triggers of their symptoms and make dietary decisions without enough information. In the following slides, we’ll explore some of the facts, myths, and up-for-debate information about food and chronic hives.

When it comes to hives, food is often listed among the common triggers for patients to be aware of. People with either chronic or acute cases of hives are often asked to keep track of their hives symptoms and note foods they consume before their symptoms started. If a food is suspected, allergy testing may be done. Other common triggers are medications, insect bites/stings, latex, infections, or other allergens people come in contact with.

For chronic idiopathic hives (or hives where a cause can’t be determined) doctors and researchers often debate if food and diet have an effect. Some studies have found that food isn’t a common trigger and diet isn’t relevant in cases of chronic hives. Other studies argue for the importance of taking a closer look at how food is involved in cases where another cause can’t be found.

Regardless of differing viewpoints by researchers, both sides have noted that patients with chronic hives often believe that their skin condition is at least aggravated by certain foods. Many people avoid foods they suspect of causing hives. These avoidance diets can affect their overall health if they aren’t getting proper nutrition, as well as their personal and social lives.

Some studies have found that patients who eat a low-histamine diet report decreased symptoms and improved quality of life. Histamine is a chemical released from mast cells in the body as part of an allergic response. In one study from Korea, patients showed significant improvement in their symptoms and decreasing levels of histamine in their blood after being on a histamine-free diet for four weeks.

Although studies noted that less than 2 percent of chronic hives cases have a food allergy, some chronic hives patients are believed to have a histamine intolerance, which may be a trigger for their unexplained hives. A histamine intolerance mimics reactions similar to a food allergy, and may cause a hives reaction, but it’s unclear how common these reactions are among chronic hives patients.

A person with a food allergy has an immediate reaction after eating the food. Skin and blood tests will confirm the allergy. People with a histamine intolerance have these chemicals build in their system over time. Once histamines reach a certain threshold, it can cause an allergic-type reaction, like hives. It’s likely the person will test negative for a food allergy. Because of this, histamine intolerance is considered a “pseudoallergy.”

Based on the theory that some people with chronic hives have a histamine intolerance, researchers have examined the effect of low histamine/low pseudoallergy diets. One study, which looked at 56 patients who followed a low-histamine diet for three weeks, found that 75 percent of patients showed improved symptoms for their chronic hives. That study also concluded that a low-histamine diet followed for three to four weeks may help reduce symptoms and improve quality of life for people suffering from chronic hives.

Foods that are typically avoided are known to be high in histamines or can cause a histamine response. These may include citrus fruit spinach, eggplant, tomatoes, artichokes, and avocado aged cheeses and fermented foods, such as gouda and sauerkraut processed meats like sausage and salami shrimp and processed fish including sardines, tuna, and herring. Also, egg whites and most alcoholic beverages (especially red wine) are high in histamines.

Avoiding foods high in histamines if a person doesn’t have food allergies is considered controversial. It’s ineffective and puts unnecessary restrictions on a person’s diet, some studies say. One study found that in 95 percent of patients with self-reported food reactions, the food they were eating wasn’t related to the onset of their symptoms. Still, the study found that more than 80 percent of these patients were carrying out unnecessary dietary restrictions that might be detrimental to their health.

Some doctors believe there is no connection between chronic hives and histamine intolerances, and have even called pseudoallergies a myth, saying that there isn’t enough support in these studies to prove such diets work. Other studies indicate that a low-histamine diet is an easy, low-cost tool to decrease symptoms and increase quality of life for chronic hives patients.

There is no easy answer to the question about what diet is best for people with chronic hives. In fact, this debate is one of the most contentious disagreements between the US and international medical guidelines on chronic hives.

As part of its guidelines on managing hives, the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology doesn’t recommend low-histamine (or pseudoallergen-free) diets because it says studies looking at this issue weren’t well controlled and didn’t meet stringent research standards. However, international guidelines acknowledge “pseudo allergen-free” diets as an alternative treatment that may help some chronic hives patients.

The World Allergy Organization has also noted that that doctors in different areas of the world have widely differing views when it comes to low-histamine diets for chronic hives. While many U.S. doctors see low-histamine diets as having limited success, some doctors in Europe and elsewhere recommend such diets be followed and then gradually expanded.

Rachel Zohn is a mom, a wife, and a freelance writer who is striving to find the best way to juggle it all and maintain a sense of humor. She is a former newspaper reporter with a deep interest in writing about all things related to health, wellness and the human body. She enjoys writing about various health topics, including skin conditions such as eczema, different types of cancer and seasonal allergies.


Chronic Hives and Diet: The Debate Over What To Eat

What we eat has a huge impact on our health, but the best choices to make aren’t always obvious, especially when dealing with a difficult condition like chronic hives. Many people with chronic hives (also known as chronic urticaria) identify different foods as possible triggers of their symptoms and make dietary decisions without enough information. In the following slides, we’ll explore some of the facts, myths, and up-for-debate information about food and chronic hives.

When it comes to hives, food is often listed among the common triggers for patients to be aware of. People with either chronic or acute cases of hives are often asked to keep track of their hives symptoms and note foods they consume before their symptoms started. If a food is suspected, allergy testing may be done. Other common triggers are medications, insect bites/stings, latex, infections, or other allergens people come in contact with.

For chronic idiopathic hives (or hives where a cause can’t be determined) doctors and researchers often debate if food and diet have an effect. Some studies have found that food isn’t a common trigger and diet isn’t relevant in cases of chronic hives. Other studies argue for the importance of taking a closer look at how food is involved in cases where another cause can’t be found.

Regardless of differing viewpoints by researchers, both sides have noted that patients with chronic hives often believe that their skin condition is at least aggravated by certain foods. Many people avoid foods they suspect of causing hives. These avoidance diets can affect their overall health if they aren’t getting proper nutrition, as well as their personal and social lives.

Some studies have found that patients who eat a low-histamine diet report decreased symptoms and improved quality of life. Histamine is a chemical released from mast cells in the body as part of an allergic response. In one study from Korea, patients showed significant improvement in their symptoms and decreasing levels of histamine in their blood after being on a histamine-free diet for four weeks.

Although studies noted that less than 2 percent of chronic hives cases have a food allergy, some chronic hives patients are believed to have a histamine intolerance, which may be a trigger for their unexplained hives. A histamine intolerance mimics reactions similar to a food allergy, and may cause a hives reaction, but it’s unclear how common these reactions are among chronic hives patients.

A person with a food allergy has an immediate reaction after eating the food. Skin and blood tests will confirm the allergy. People with a histamine intolerance have these chemicals build in their system over time. Once histamines reach a certain threshold, it can cause an allergic-type reaction, like hives. It’s likely the person will test negative for a food allergy. Because of this, histamine intolerance is considered a “pseudoallergy.”

Based on the theory that some people with chronic hives have a histamine intolerance, researchers have examined the effect of low histamine/low pseudoallergy diets. One study, which looked at 56 patients who followed a low-histamine diet for three weeks, found that 75 percent of patients showed improved symptoms for their chronic hives. That study also concluded that a low-histamine diet followed for three to four weeks may help reduce symptoms and improve quality of life for people suffering from chronic hives.

Foods that are typically avoided are known to be high in histamines or can cause a histamine response. These may include citrus fruit spinach, eggplant, tomatoes, artichokes, and avocado aged cheeses and fermented foods, such as gouda and sauerkraut processed meats like sausage and salami shrimp and processed fish including sardines, tuna, and herring. Also, egg whites and most alcoholic beverages (especially red wine) are high in histamines.

Avoiding foods high in histamines if a person doesn’t have food allergies is considered controversial. It’s ineffective and puts unnecessary restrictions on a person’s diet, some studies say. One study found that in 95 percent of patients with self-reported food reactions, the food they were eating wasn’t related to the onset of their symptoms. Still, the study found that more than 80 percent of these patients were carrying out unnecessary dietary restrictions that might be detrimental to their health.

Some doctors believe there is no connection between chronic hives and histamine intolerances, and have even called pseudoallergies a myth, saying that there isn’t enough support in these studies to prove such diets work. Other studies indicate that a low-histamine diet is an easy, low-cost tool to decrease symptoms and increase quality of life for chronic hives patients.

There is no easy answer to the question about what diet is best for people with chronic hives. In fact, this debate is one of the most contentious disagreements between the US and international medical guidelines on chronic hives.

As part of its guidelines on managing hives, the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology doesn’t recommend low-histamine (or pseudoallergen-free) diets because it says studies looking at this issue weren’t well controlled and didn’t meet stringent research standards. However, international guidelines acknowledge “pseudo allergen-free” diets as an alternative treatment that may help some chronic hives patients.

The World Allergy Organization has also noted that that doctors in different areas of the world have widely differing views when it comes to low-histamine diets for chronic hives. While many U.S. doctors see low-histamine diets as having limited success, some doctors in Europe and elsewhere recommend such diets be followed and then gradually expanded.

Rachel Zohn is a mom, a wife, and a freelance writer who is striving to find the best way to juggle it all and maintain a sense of humor. She is a former newspaper reporter with a deep interest in writing about all things related to health, wellness and the human body. She enjoys writing about various health topics, including skin conditions such as eczema, different types of cancer and seasonal allergies.


Chronic Hives and Diet: The Debate Over What To Eat

What we eat has a huge impact on our health, but the best choices to make aren’t always obvious, especially when dealing with a difficult condition like chronic hives. Many people with chronic hives (also known as chronic urticaria) identify different foods as possible triggers of their symptoms and make dietary decisions without enough information. In the following slides, we’ll explore some of the facts, myths, and up-for-debate information about food and chronic hives.

When it comes to hives, food is often listed among the common triggers for patients to be aware of. People with either chronic or acute cases of hives are often asked to keep track of their hives symptoms and note foods they consume before their symptoms started. If a food is suspected, allergy testing may be done. Other common triggers are medications, insect bites/stings, latex, infections, or other allergens people come in contact with.

For chronic idiopathic hives (or hives where a cause can’t be determined) doctors and researchers often debate if food and diet have an effect. Some studies have found that food isn’t a common trigger and diet isn’t relevant in cases of chronic hives. Other studies argue for the importance of taking a closer look at how food is involved in cases where another cause can’t be found.

Regardless of differing viewpoints by researchers, both sides have noted that patients with chronic hives often believe that their skin condition is at least aggravated by certain foods. Many people avoid foods they suspect of causing hives. These avoidance diets can affect their overall health if they aren’t getting proper nutrition, as well as their personal and social lives.

Some studies have found that patients who eat a low-histamine diet report decreased symptoms and improved quality of life. Histamine is a chemical released from mast cells in the body as part of an allergic response. In one study from Korea, patients showed significant improvement in their symptoms and decreasing levels of histamine in their blood after being on a histamine-free diet for four weeks.

Although studies noted that less than 2 percent of chronic hives cases have a food allergy, some chronic hives patients are believed to have a histamine intolerance, which may be a trigger for their unexplained hives. A histamine intolerance mimics reactions similar to a food allergy, and may cause a hives reaction, but it’s unclear how common these reactions are among chronic hives patients.

A person with a food allergy has an immediate reaction after eating the food. Skin and blood tests will confirm the allergy. People with a histamine intolerance have these chemicals build in their system over time. Once histamines reach a certain threshold, it can cause an allergic-type reaction, like hives. It’s likely the person will test negative for a food allergy. Because of this, histamine intolerance is considered a “pseudoallergy.”

Based on the theory that some people with chronic hives have a histamine intolerance, researchers have examined the effect of low histamine/low pseudoallergy diets. One study, which looked at 56 patients who followed a low-histamine diet for three weeks, found that 75 percent of patients showed improved symptoms for their chronic hives. That study also concluded that a low-histamine diet followed for three to four weeks may help reduce symptoms and improve quality of life for people suffering from chronic hives.

Foods that are typically avoided are known to be high in histamines or can cause a histamine response. These may include citrus fruit spinach, eggplant, tomatoes, artichokes, and avocado aged cheeses and fermented foods, such as gouda and sauerkraut processed meats like sausage and salami shrimp and processed fish including sardines, tuna, and herring. Also, egg whites and most alcoholic beverages (especially red wine) are high in histamines.

Avoiding foods high in histamines if a person doesn’t have food allergies is considered controversial. It’s ineffective and puts unnecessary restrictions on a person’s diet, some studies say. One study found that in 95 percent of patients with self-reported food reactions, the food they were eating wasn’t related to the onset of their symptoms. Still, the study found that more than 80 percent of these patients were carrying out unnecessary dietary restrictions that might be detrimental to their health.

Some doctors believe there is no connection between chronic hives and histamine intolerances, and have even called pseudoallergies a myth, saying that there isn’t enough support in these studies to prove such diets work. Other studies indicate that a low-histamine diet is an easy, low-cost tool to decrease symptoms and increase quality of life for chronic hives patients.

There is no easy answer to the question about what diet is best for people with chronic hives. In fact, this debate is one of the most contentious disagreements between the US and international medical guidelines on chronic hives.

As part of its guidelines on managing hives, the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology doesn’t recommend low-histamine (or pseudoallergen-free) diets because it says studies looking at this issue weren’t well controlled and didn’t meet stringent research standards. However, international guidelines acknowledge “pseudo allergen-free” diets as an alternative treatment that may help some chronic hives patients.

The World Allergy Organization has also noted that that doctors in different areas of the world have widely differing views when it comes to low-histamine diets for chronic hives. While many U.S. doctors see low-histamine diets as having limited success, some doctors in Europe and elsewhere recommend such diets be followed and then gradually expanded.

Rachel Zohn is a mom, a wife, and a freelance writer who is striving to find the best way to juggle it all and maintain a sense of humor. She is a former newspaper reporter with a deep interest in writing about all things related to health, wellness and the human body. She enjoys writing about various health topics, including skin conditions such as eczema, different types of cancer and seasonal allergies.


Chronic Hives and Diet: The Debate Over What To Eat

What we eat has a huge impact on our health, but the best choices to make aren’t always obvious, especially when dealing with a difficult condition like chronic hives. Many people with chronic hives (also known as chronic urticaria) identify different foods as possible triggers of their symptoms and make dietary decisions without enough information. In the following slides, we’ll explore some of the facts, myths, and up-for-debate information about food and chronic hives.

When it comes to hives, food is often listed among the common triggers for patients to be aware of. People with either chronic or acute cases of hives are often asked to keep track of their hives symptoms and note foods they consume before their symptoms started. If a food is suspected, allergy testing may be done. Other common triggers are medications, insect bites/stings, latex, infections, or other allergens people come in contact with.

For chronic idiopathic hives (or hives where a cause can’t be determined) doctors and researchers often debate if food and diet have an effect. Some studies have found that food isn’t a common trigger and diet isn’t relevant in cases of chronic hives. Other studies argue for the importance of taking a closer look at how food is involved in cases where another cause can’t be found.

Regardless of differing viewpoints by researchers, both sides have noted that patients with chronic hives often believe that their skin condition is at least aggravated by certain foods. Many people avoid foods they suspect of causing hives. These avoidance diets can affect their overall health if they aren’t getting proper nutrition, as well as their personal and social lives.

Some studies have found that patients who eat a low-histamine diet report decreased symptoms and improved quality of life. Histamine is a chemical released from mast cells in the body as part of an allergic response. In one study from Korea, patients showed significant improvement in their symptoms and decreasing levels of histamine in their blood after being on a histamine-free diet for four weeks.

Although studies noted that less than 2 percent of chronic hives cases have a food allergy, some chronic hives patients are believed to have a histamine intolerance, which may be a trigger for their unexplained hives. A histamine intolerance mimics reactions similar to a food allergy, and may cause a hives reaction, but it’s unclear how common these reactions are among chronic hives patients.

A person with a food allergy has an immediate reaction after eating the food. Skin and blood tests will confirm the allergy. People with a histamine intolerance have these chemicals build in their system over time. Once histamines reach a certain threshold, it can cause an allergic-type reaction, like hives. It’s likely the person will test negative for a food allergy. Because of this, histamine intolerance is considered a “pseudoallergy.”

Based on the theory that some people with chronic hives have a histamine intolerance, researchers have examined the effect of low histamine/low pseudoallergy diets. One study, which looked at 56 patients who followed a low-histamine diet for three weeks, found that 75 percent of patients showed improved symptoms for their chronic hives. That study also concluded that a low-histamine diet followed for three to four weeks may help reduce symptoms and improve quality of life for people suffering from chronic hives.

Foods that are typically avoided are known to be high in histamines or can cause a histamine response. These may include citrus fruit spinach, eggplant, tomatoes, artichokes, and avocado aged cheeses and fermented foods, such as gouda and sauerkraut processed meats like sausage and salami shrimp and processed fish including sardines, tuna, and herring. Also, egg whites and most alcoholic beverages (especially red wine) are high in histamines.

Avoiding foods high in histamines if a person doesn’t have food allergies is considered controversial. It’s ineffective and puts unnecessary restrictions on a person’s diet, some studies say. One study found that in 95 percent of patients with self-reported food reactions, the food they were eating wasn’t related to the onset of their symptoms. Still, the study found that more than 80 percent of these patients were carrying out unnecessary dietary restrictions that might be detrimental to their health.

Some doctors believe there is no connection between chronic hives and histamine intolerances, and have even called pseudoallergies a myth, saying that there isn’t enough support in these studies to prove such diets work. Other studies indicate that a low-histamine diet is an easy, low-cost tool to decrease symptoms and increase quality of life for chronic hives patients.

There is no easy answer to the question about what diet is best for people with chronic hives. In fact, this debate is one of the most contentious disagreements between the US and international medical guidelines on chronic hives.

As part of its guidelines on managing hives, the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology doesn’t recommend low-histamine (or pseudoallergen-free) diets because it says studies looking at this issue weren’t well controlled and didn’t meet stringent research standards. However, international guidelines acknowledge “pseudo allergen-free” diets as an alternative treatment that may help some chronic hives patients.

The World Allergy Organization has also noted that that doctors in different areas of the world have widely differing views when it comes to low-histamine diets for chronic hives. While many U.S. doctors see low-histamine diets as having limited success, some doctors in Europe and elsewhere recommend such diets be followed and then gradually expanded.

Rachel Zohn is a mom, a wife, and a freelance writer who is striving to find the best way to juggle it all and maintain a sense of humor. She is a former newspaper reporter with a deep interest in writing about all things related to health, wellness and the human body. She enjoys writing about various health topics, including skin conditions such as eczema, different types of cancer and seasonal allergies.


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