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Conservative Group Protests "Schweddy Balls" Ice Cream

Conservative Group Protests


"The vulgar new flavor has turned something as innocent as ice cream into something repulsive," they say

Ben & Jerry's "Schweddy Balls" flavor, with vanilla ice cream and fudge-covered rum and malt balls

One Million Moms has called for a boycott of the SNL-inspired Ben & Jerry's vanilla-and-rum flavor, hoping that the company will "refrain from producing another batch with this name or any other offensive names."

This is hardly surprising, since OMM is affiliated with the American Family Association. This is the group that also called for a petition against Dancing With the Stars and Sesame Street's Bert and Ernie. They've also previously boycotted Ben & Jerry's "Chubby Hubby" and "Hubby Hubby" flavors, which were developed in support of gay marriage.

This time around, the group calls "Schweddy Balls" a "tasteless" name, saying it's "not exactly what you want a child asking for at the supermarket."

Good point on that last one, but it's not like children will know what it means. Also, what kid likes rum?

The Daily Byte is a regular column dedicated to covering interesting food news and trends across the country. Click here for previous columns.


Don't Just Boycott the Oscars, Destroy Them

It’s heartening that Spike Lee, Jada Pinkett Smith, and, as of this morning, her husband Will Smith have publicly denounced the Academy Awards, declaring that they will not be attending this year’s ceremony. The Oscars, though seen as a pinnacle of artistic achievement, really amount to cherries on top of a bowl of them. They represent more success to those who have already had so much of it—success in getting a movie made, and then success in getting it sufficient attention to yield Oscars, either by selling a lot of tickets or wooing critics, or, most frequently, some mixture of the two. It’s high time we reevaluate how much we invest in their importance.


Don't Just Boycott the Oscars, Destroy Them

It’s heartening that Spike Lee, Jada Pinkett Smith, and, as of this morning, her husband Will Smith have publicly denounced the Academy Awards, declaring that they will not be attending this year’s ceremony. The Oscars, though seen as a pinnacle of artistic achievement, really amount to cherries on top of a bowl of them. They represent more success to those who have already had so much of it—success in getting a movie made, and then success in getting it sufficient attention to yield Oscars, either by selling a lot of tickets or wooing critics, or, most frequently, some mixture of the two. It’s high time we reevaluate how much we invest in their importance.


Don't Just Boycott the Oscars, Destroy Them

It’s heartening that Spike Lee, Jada Pinkett Smith, and, as of this morning, her husband Will Smith have publicly denounced the Academy Awards, declaring that they will not be attending this year’s ceremony. The Oscars, though seen as a pinnacle of artistic achievement, really amount to cherries on top of a bowl of them. They represent more success to those who have already had so much of it—success in getting a movie made, and then success in getting it sufficient attention to yield Oscars, either by selling a lot of tickets or wooing critics, or, most frequently, some mixture of the two. It’s high time we reevaluate how much we invest in their importance.


Don't Just Boycott the Oscars, Destroy Them

It’s heartening that Spike Lee, Jada Pinkett Smith, and, as of this morning, her husband Will Smith have publicly denounced the Academy Awards, declaring that they will not be attending this year’s ceremony. The Oscars, though seen as a pinnacle of artistic achievement, really amount to cherries on top of a bowl of them. They represent more success to those who have already had so much of it—success in getting a movie made, and then success in getting it sufficient attention to yield Oscars, either by selling a lot of tickets or wooing critics, or, most frequently, some mixture of the two. It’s high time we reevaluate how much we invest in their importance.


Don't Just Boycott the Oscars, Destroy Them

It’s heartening that Spike Lee, Jada Pinkett Smith, and, as of this morning, her husband Will Smith have publicly denounced the Academy Awards, declaring that they will not be attending this year’s ceremony. The Oscars, though seen as a pinnacle of artistic achievement, really amount to cherries on top of a bowl of them. They represent more success to those who have already had so much of it—success in getting a movie made, and then success in getting it sufficient attention to yield Oscars, either by selling a lot of tickets or wooing critics, or, most frequently, some mixture of the two. It’s high time we reevaluate how much we invest in their importance.


Don't Just Boycott the Oscars, Destroy Them

It’s heartening that Spike Lee, Jada Pinkett Smith, and, as of this morning, her husband Will Smith have publicly denounced the Academy Awards, declaring that they will not be attending this year’s ceremony. The Oscars, though seen as a pinnacle of artistic achievement, really amount to cherries on top of a bowl of them. They represent more success to those who have already had so much of it—success in getting a movie made, and then success in getting it sufficient attention to yield Oscars, either by selling a lot of tickets or wooing critics, or, most frequently, some mixture of the two. It’s high time we reevaluate how much we invest in their importance.


Don't Just Boycott the Oscars, Destroy Them

It’s heartening that Spike Lee, Jada Pinkett Smith, and, as of this morning, her husband Will Smith have publicly denounced the Academy Awards, declaring that they will not be attending this year’s ceremony. The Oscars, though seen as a pinnacle of artistic achievement, really amount to cherries on top of a bowl of them. They represent more success to those who have already had so much of it—success in getting a movie made, and then success in getting it sufficient attention to yield Oscars, either by selling a lot of tickets or wooing critics, or, most frequently, some mixture of the two. It’s high time we reevaluate how much we invest in their importance.


Don't Just Boycott the Oscars, Destroy Them

It’s heartening that Spike Lee, Jada Pinkett Smith, and, as of this morning, her husband Will Smith have publicly denounced the Academy Awards, declaring that they will not be attending this year’s ceremony. The Oscars, though seen as a pinnacle of artistic achievement, really amount to cherries on top of a bowl of them. They represent more success to those who have already had so much of it—success in getting a movie made, and then success in getting it sufficient attention to yield Oscars, either by selling a lot of tickets or wooing critics, or, most frequently, some mixture of the two. It’s high time we reevaluate how much we invest in their importance.


Don't Just Boycott the Oscars, Destroy Them

It’s heartening that Spike Lee, Jada Pinkett Smith, and, as of this morning, her husband Will Smith have publicly denounced the Academy Awards, declaring that they will not be attending this year’s ceremony. The Oscars, though seen as a pinnacle of artistic achievement, really amount to cherries on top of a bowl of them. They represent more success to those who have already had so much of it—success in getting a movie made, and then success in getting it sufficient attention to yield Oscars, either by selling a lot of tickets or wooing critics, or, most frequently, some mixture of the two. It’s high time we reevaluate how much we invest in their importance.


Don't Just Boycott the Oscars, Destroy Them

It’s heartening that Spike Lee, Jada Pinkett Smith, and, as of this morning, her husband Will Smith have publicly denounced the Academy Awards, declaring that they will not be attending this year’s ceremony. The Oscars, though seen as a pinnacle of artistic achievement, really amount to cherries on top of a bowl of them. They represent more success to those who have already had so much of it—success in getting a movie made, and then success in getting it sufficient attention to yield Oscars, either by selling a lot of tickets or wooing critics, or, most frequently, some mixture of the two. It’s high time we reevaluate how much we invest in their importance.